In the pantry: Sesame seeds

Nutty, sweet, and buttery are the best ways to describe sesame seeds. Grown widely in India and Asia from a flowering plant, it is one of the oldest condiments known. Available in a host of colours including white, red, black, and yellow, sesame seeds have one of the highest oil content in any seed. It’s widely used in a variety of cuisines including Asian, Mexican, … Continue reading In the pantry: Sesame seeds

Nutritious chia seeds on a wooden spoon

In the pantry: Chia seeds

The craze over chia seeds has only popped up recently because of so-called recently discovered health benefits and has now been labelled as a ‘superfood’. But chia seeds for centuries have been native to southern Mexico and Guatemala. Chia seeds derive from a plant that is native to the region, and for centuries before that it was consumed by the Aztecs and Mayans as part of … Continue reading In the pantry: Chia seeds

Garam masala spice mix

In the pantry: Garam masala

This is a common blend of spice used in Indian cooking, especially North Indian. Usually made up of spices including black pepper, cardamom, cumin, and nutmeg, garam masala can contain up to 12 spices. It is is an all-purpose spice blend that adds a warm and sweet flavour to chicken, lamb, fish, rice, or bread, and is often added to a dish towards the end … Continue reading In the pantry: Garam masala

In the pantry: Kaffir lime leaves

In the pantry: Kaffir lime leaves

Much as the name suggests these leaves originate off the citrus trees of kaffir limes, a plant native to tropical Asia including Thailand, Myanmar, and Malaysia. But unlike normal lime leaves, kaffir limes are thicker and more aromatic, which means not too many leaves are needed to give a zesty punch to a dish. The leaves are often when used in stews, curries, and stir-fries. … Continue reading In the pantry: Kaffir lime leaves

In the pantry: Sumac

In the pantry: Sumac

Sumac is the flower of a short shrub grown in many subtropical regions, in particular Africa and North America. Tart in flavour and acidic in nature, Sumac is commonly used in Middle Eastern cuisine sprinkled over in salads or as part of a meat marinade. It is often a substitute for lemon because the tanginess of sumac is not as overpowering. The bonus is that … Continue reading In the pantry: Sumac